Spiked Math Games  // Math Fail Blog  // Gauss Facts  // Spiked Math Forums  // Spiked Math Comics

home     info     archive     contact     rss

Google+ Page   //   Facebook Page   //   Twitter Page



Recent Comments
  • By Anonymous in Is math beautiful?: I wonder if Rule 110 should be there, too read in context
  • By krilky in The cos y function: Dumb question--what do the counter and cookie thing at the bottom of your site mean? Thanks for continuing to put out comics. Wish you the best :D read in context
  • By lalala in Please, Think of the Kittens!: Kittens form a finite set. Thus, arrange kittens by measure. There exists a kitten with maximal measure. This is the chosen one. read in context
  • By bmonk in The cos y function: If he is not careful to switch the "standard" positions of the x and y axes, he might get dumped on the floor. read in context
  • By Janek in The cos y function: It appeared already, long time ago: http://spikedmath.com/163.html read in context
  • By Jamie in The cos y function: A hammock in the office - still the dream... What are the odds on the function sec(c) appearing next? ;-) read in context
  • By Bill in Three logicians walk into a bar: It is so clear that 1 and 2 WANT beer. They MUST. If they do NOT want beer, they are LYING when they say "I don't know" because they KNOW that NOT EVERYONE wants beer. Since they cannot lie, their "I don't know" REQUIRES that they themselves WANT beer. This is the basis of the logical assumption made by #3. Her "yes" is based on the FACT that she KNOWS that 1 and 2 MUST undeniably want beer or else they are lying about not knowing the true answer to the barmaid's question. read in context
  • By atehwa in Online Dating: "Known languages" means languages that are known, in general, right? read in context
  • By Pirenz in MFT - Tau: By the way, d^2/(circular area) = 4/pi Work: d^2/(circular area) Circular area = pi * r^2 d = 2 r [(2r)^2]/(pi*r^2) Expand: (2r)^2=(2r)(2r)=(2*2)(r*r)=4*r^2 [4*r^2]/(pi*r^2) 4/pi read in context
  • By Boniface in Geeky PINs: No true Geek follower of Spiked Math would take 0047. read in context
  • By Boniface in Geeky PINs: 1729 is also the number that allowed Richard Feynman to outperform an abacus--they got to cube roots, and he knew 12^3 = 1728, so he was able to figure the residue very quickly. read in context
  • By Pirenz in Practical Jokes: Hahahaha! Because the kid doesn't know that cosine of negative alpha is the same as cosine alpha When the student comes back from the bathroom: *Sees paper* "Thanks. Thus the answer is tangent alpha...hue, luckily teacher only gave 2 questions" *Leaves* *The 47 guy RAGES* read in context
  • By rdococ in Dear internet: Just because you don't like convention doesn't mean you have the right to force a different convention! If everybody else used this convention, then you'd just force another!!! read in context
  • By Nancy in MPF - Hats: Zwejhajfa: I agree with your solution. Moreover, the probability 1-1/2N of winning for 2N-1 logicians cannot be beaten: indeed, assume that the strategy of the logicians is devised so that the first one shall answer something (rather than passing) in a proportion p(1) of the cases, the second one will answer in a proportion p(2) of the cases, etc. Obviously, whatever the strategy chosen, each time a logician answers he will be right half the time, and wrong half the time. So, the probability that at least one logician gets right is at most ∑ p(i)/2 (that value maximum being attained provided that it nevers occurs that two logicians get right at the same time), and the probability that at least one gets wrong is at least max p(i)/2 (that value being attained provided that, each time some logician gets wrong, then necessarily the logician with maximal p(i) gets wrong too). So, the probability of losing divided by the probability of winning is at least (max p(i)/2)/(∑ p(i)/2), which is obviously always larger than or equal to the number of logicians. This corresponds to a probability of winning of 1-1/(Z+1), Z being the number of logicians, which indeed is attained by Zwejhajfa's strategy in the case Z = 2N-1. read in context
  • By FrozenWinters in What is the limit?: L'Hop is always handy. A year after taking calc, this was a warm brush up on those skills. :P read in context
  • By Pirenz in Happy Saint Math Trick's Day!: Add 14 before dividing by 12! Then the decimal part will be .25 which is 3/12 so the trick works read in context
  • By Pirenz in Escape: Me neither read in context
  • By Pirenz in The Super Duper Amazing Number Trick: You use the CEILING function before raising it to pi!!!!!! Example: Ceiling (0.85...) = 1 Ceiling (2.13) = 3 Round it up!!!!! (To nearest whole number) read in context
  • By Pirenz in Spiked Math's excuse guide to not doing your math homework: By the way, Limit as x approaches 0 of the function given (cotangent x over cosecant x) is 1 Work: F(x) = cot(x)/csc(x) Dividing by cosecant is the same as multiplying by the reciprocal, sine F(x) = cot(x) sin(x) The cotangent is cosine divided by sine F(x) = cos(x)/sin(x) * sin(x) The sine cancels F(x) = cos(x) Thus the limit as x approaches 0 of F(x) is the cosine of 0 or 1 Q.E.D. read in context
  • By bmonk in Infinite Graduate Student Theorem: But--will he recognize when it is done? read in context
  • By Pirenz in What is the square root of nine?: www.anagramgenius.com/checker.html read in context
  • By engineer in What is the limit?: Hint: Use the small-angle approximation for the sine function. read in context
  • By Spiked Math in Half Angle Identities: All fixed now. read in context
  • By Spiked Math in Half Angle Identities: Right you are! I didn't change it from copying/pasting the one for sine. read in context
  • By Dr. What in Half Angle Identities: wait... shouldn't that be 1+cos(theta)? or is it some point i didn't get? read in context
  • By Mark in What is the limit?: It seems that WolframAlpha needs a few explicit parentheses to make it work. http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=lim+x-%3Ek+s*x^2*y*sin%28k-x%29%2F%28k^2-kx%29 read in context
  • By Param in highschoolnerd: That's Me! read in context
  • By (x, why?) in What is the limit?: This one was over my head! read in context
  • By Gast in What is the limit?: Epsilon seems to be especially large this month. This ist wunderbar. read in context
  • By Trekkie in Geeky PINs: What about 47 (from Star Trek)? read in context
  • By Lucas in Fractal Flowchart: Is http://xkcd.com/1488/ inspired by you? If yes, then I think you deserve to be mentioned there! read in context
  • By blazemonger in What is the limit?: Thank you, Wolfram Alpha: http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=lim%28x-%3Ek%29%28%28s*x%5E2*y*sin%28k-x%29%29%2F%28k%5E2-kx%29%29 read in context
  • By The sky is the limit in What is the limit?: The sky is the limit! read in context
  • By Constant in What is the limit?: I think nancy just saw the image as was confused read in context
  • By Spiked Math in What is the limit?: You don't seem very confident in your answer! read in context
  • By nancy in What is the limit?: sky? read in context
  • By Spiked Math in Upper Heisenberg Matrix: No problemo... read in context
  • By (x, why?) in Upper Heisenberg Matrix: Thanks for the shoutout! If anyone wants to comment on the (x, why?) comic, visit the blog page: http://mrburkemath.blogspot.com/2010/08/identity-matrix.html Sadly, I can't code a link on each comic page to the blog page. No time. read in context
  • By Jurjen in Geeky PINs: I miss 9564, the ISO standard for the encoding of PINs. read in context
  • By Anonymous in Geeky Revenge: When he forms the quadratic, it should be - 360, not + 360. read in context
  • By Magnema in Upper Heisenberg Matrix: If it's a Heisenberg matrix, shouldn't all the entries have an uncertainty of hbar/2? read in context
  • By gaussian in The NeverEnding Story: A completely irrational expectation. read in context
  • By Anonymous in The NeverEnding Story: Please, no spoilers in the comments section! read in context
  • By bmonk in The NeverEnding Story: But this continuing story is only a fraction of the whole! read in context
  • By Michael in Reading Textbooks: This is an excerpt from "Mathematical Apocrypha" by Steven G. Krantz that I think applies here: "One day Shizuo Kakutani was teaching a class at Yale. He wrote down a lemma on the blackboard and announced that the proof was obvious. One student timidly raised his hand and said that it wasn't obvious to him. Could Kakutani explain? After several moments' thought, Kakutani realized that he could not himself prove the lemma. He apologized, and said that he would report back at their next class meeting. After class, Kakutani, went straight to his office. He labored for quite a time and found that he could not prove the pesky lemma. He skipped lunch and went to the library to track down the lemma. After much work, he finally found the original paper. The lemma was stated clearly and succinctly. For the proof, the author had written, 'Exercise for the reader.' The author of this 1941 paper was Kakutani." read in context
  • By Spiked Math in Reading Textbooks: That's fair. I am usually the opposite when writing learning resources in that I give too much detail! read in context
  • By Pastafarianist in Reading Textbooks: If you do that, I'll come to your house with a flamethrower. read in context
  • By Alyssa Hillary in Fractal Flowchart: Fraaaaactals. Also, this reminds me a bit of the xkcd with the flowchart about learning/knowing how to read a flowchart. Yay for flowcharts! read in context
  • By lm_aquarius in Fractal Flowchart: @Martin, your creation is disturbingly addictive - nice job! :) read in context